Treat your body like a temple, not a woodshed.

The mind and body work together.

Your body needs to be a good support system for the mind and spirit.

If you take good care of it, your body can take you wherever you want to go,

with the power, strength, energy, and vitality you will need to get there.

 

— Jim Rohn

 

Religious and spiritual references abound that refer to the body as a temple, a holy place, a place of reverence, respect, and beauty.  But what does that really mean?  

 

A temple is a dwelling place for God(s), Spirit, Source, Creator of all that is.  A temple is a sacred revered place, holding the spirit of God. As we are spiritual beings having a human experience, our physical bodies are the housing of our spiritual essence, the place we have chosen to take residence in for our brief time on the earthly plane, where we take comfort, rest, integrate life’s experiences, expand, celebrate, and nurture ourselves. 

 

If I walked into a temple that was dirty, smelly, broken down, decaying, or filled with trash bags of fat, sugars, and waste, I’d get out as fast as my legs could take me.  So, why do we treat our bodies like disposable trash bags?

 

According to the article, “Obesity Rates & Trends Overview,” on Stateofobesity.org, “Obesity rates vary state-to-state, but remain high nationwide. Across the United States, more than 1 in 3 adults and 1 in 6 children (ages 2-19) are obese, and 1 in 11 young children (ages 2-5) are obese.”  300,000,000 people around the world suffer from depression, according to the World Health Organization, and 16.2 million adults in the United States (6.7% of adults in the US) have experienced a major depressive episode in the past year.  One third of Americans are obese, and nearly 7% suffer from depression.  Why?

 

If you were allowed only one car to last your entire life, would you fill it with bad fluids, put on old tires, use low quality parts, fill it with trash, or toxic chemicals?  No.  You would use only the best products you could find to keep it in top shape.  You would make every effort to keep it clean, neat, pristine, and well maintained for optimum performance and durability.  You would do everything in your power to make sure it would last for your entire life, wouldn’t you?  

 

You only get one body to last your entire life.  If you wear out your body, where are you going to live?

 

Countless published studies show that the foods, drinks, medications, and substances we put into our mouths directly result in our record numbers of illnesses. It’s not just the type of food we eat, but also the chemicals used to mass produce, preserve, and artificially structure and design them to attract us—and addict us. These chemicals, including artificial and animal hormones, preservatives, artificial colors, thickening agents, dyes, waxes, artificial fragrances, conditioners, binders, artificial sweeteners, genetic modifiers, pesticides, antibiotics, weed killers, and many others are being ingested by us, and our Loved ones, every day. Our body temples were not designed to ingest or digest any of these, which is evident in the increasing numbers and varieties of health addictions and body afflictions.

Front Desk Position Opening!

According to Chapter 2 of the United States Department of Agriculture Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015-2010 Eighth Edition, (https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/), our current typical eating patterns in the United States do not align with the healthy Dietary Guidelines, as shown in the chart below.  About three-fourths of the population has an eating pattern that is low in vegetables, fruits, dairy, and oils.  More than half of the population is meeting or exceeding total grain and total protein foods recommendations but are not meeting the recommendations for the subgroups within each of these food groups.

 

Most Americans exceed the recommendations for added sugars, saturated fats, and sodium.  In addition, the eating patterns of many Americans are too high in calories. Calorie intake over time, in comparison to calorie needs, is best evaluated by measuring body weight status. The high percentage of the overweight or obese population suggests that many over-consume.  More than two-thirds of all adults and nearly one-third of all children and youth in the United States are either overweight or obese.

 

As a young man and Ironman triathlon participant, I believed in a healthy diet as a standard part of my life.  My motto was, “If it comes in a box, bag, or Styrofoam, I don’t eat it.”  My typical routine was train most of the year, except during the period from Thanksgiving until after the new year, when I rewarded myself for all the months of training and discipline.  Upon resuming training after the new year, I consumed a high protein diet for a few weeks, shed the extra pounds I had gained during the holiday break, and then continued as normal—my normal.  One year I noticed that I kept losing the weight, even after I stopped eating the high protein diet. I began to appear sick-looking to my friends. I was not a person who sought the care of a physician, but I did at that point.

 

I was shocked when the doctor and lab results diagnosed me with Type 2 Diabetes based on the results of a blood test that measures the A1C levels and how well the body is naturally producing insulin. The higher the number, the less the body is producing.   Level 6 is safe.  Mine was 12.  I was told that, because I had a First Nation Osage American Indian blood in my heritage, Type 2 Diabetes was in my genes and that it was not unusual to be symptom free until later in life.  

 

My treatment protocol: Insulin three times a day; Metformin twice a day; antidepressants twice a day; heart medication; liver medication; and anti-inflammatory medication for the swelling in my feet. Being sick and diseased is not cheap. I began running again, six days a week and reduced my number to a “safe” level.  The problem did not go away.  It just became hidden, less easy to detect.  Fast forward and one hip injury later, my A1C levels were back, at 9.

 

It was at that point that I was asked to watch Forks Over Knives, a now world-famous documentary highlighting the benefits of a whole food and plant-based diet. After seeing it and doing my own research, I decided to take the leap.  I abandoned all processed foods, all meats of any kind, and all dairy. Within two and a half months—without exercise—I reduced my A1C levels to 6.5.  At 6.5, you are considered non-diabetic. I have since started exercising again and have every belief in my A1C levels reaching below 6

 

The modern-day lifestyle for most Americans is a sedentary one of restricted movement. Most of us drive everywhere, rather than walk or bike, and most of us do only the bare minimum of exercise, or none at all. According to a new study by the Center for Disease Control, only one out of every five American meets the minimum weekly exercise standards recommended.  Thus, the eighty percent who do not are setting themselves up for the potential of years of health problems. https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2013/p0502-physical-activity.html 

The U.S. government recommends that adults have 2 – 2 ½ hours per week of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise, or 1 ¼ hour of vigorous-intensity activity, or a combination of both, as well as a minimum of 2 muscle-strengthening activities per week, such as lifting weights or doing push-ups.

 

Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) analyzed survey data collected from random phone calls to more than 450,000 Americans, aged eighteen and older.  When asked how often and for how long they engaged in aerobic physical activity, outside of their jobs, the data revealed that only 20.6% met the total recommended amounts of exercise—approximately 23% of the men and 18% of the women surveyed. Those who engaged in the most physical activity—nearly 31%—were between the ages of eighteen and twenty-four.  Those who exercised the least—nearly 16%—were age sixty-five and older.

 

If you see yourself in any of the statistics, are you ready and willing to change your stats and take care of your one-in-a-lifetime body temple?  

 

The following benefits, recommendations, descriptions, and tips are from the American Heart Association.

 

7 Important Benefits from getting the proper amount of exercise:

 

  • Lower risk for: heart disease; stroke; Type 2 Diabetes; high blood pressure; dementia and Alzheimer’s; several types of

cancer, and some complications of pregnancy

  • Better sleep, including improvements in insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea
  • Improved cognition, including memory, attention, and processing speed
  • Less weight gain, obesity, and weight related chronic health conditions
  • Better bone health and balance and less risk of injury from falls
  • Fewer symptoms of depression and anxiety
  • Better quality of life and sense of overall well-being

 

Recommendations for Physical Activity for Adults:

 

  • Get at least 2 ½ hours per week of moderate-intensity aerobic activity, or 1 ¼ hour per week of vigorous aerobic activity, or a combination of both, preferably spread throughout the week.
  • Add moderate- to high-intensity muscle-strengthening activity (such as resistance or weights) at least 2 days per week.
  • Spend less time sitting. Even light-intensity activity can offset some of the risks of being sedentary.
  • Gain even more benefits by being active at least 5 hours per week.
  • Increase amount and intensity gradually over time.

Recommendations for Physical Activity for Kids:

  • Children 3-5 years old need to be physically active and have plenty of opportunities to move throughout the day.
  • Kids aged 6-17 need at least 1 hour per day of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity, mostly aerobic.
  • Include vigorous-intensity activity at least 3 days per week.
  • Include muscle- and bone-strengthening (weight-bearing) activities at least 3 days per week.
  • Increase amount and intensity gradually over time.

Physical Activity is anything that moves our body and burns calories. This includes things like walking, climbing stairs and stretching.

Aerobic Activity, aka cardio, gets the heart rate up and benefitting by improving cardio-respiratory fitness. When done at moderate intensity, the heart will beat faster, and you will breathe harder than normal, but you will still be able to talk. Think of it as a medium or moderate amount of effort. Vigorous intensity activities will push your body a little further. They will require a higher amount of effort. You will probably get warm and begin to sweat. You will not be able to talk much without getting out of breath.

For maximum benefits, include both moderate- and vigorous-intensity activity in your routine, along with strengthening and stretching exercises. Knowing your heart rate will also help you track the intensity of the activity. 

 

Moderate-Intensity Aerobic Activities:

 

  • Brisk walking (at least 2.5 miles per hour)
  • Water aerobics
  • Dancing (ballroom or social)
  • Gardening
  • Tennis (doubles)
  • Biking slower than 10 miles per hour

Vigorous-Intensity Aerobic Activities:

 

  • Hiking uphill or with a heavy backpack
  • Running
  • Swimming laps
  • Aerobic dancing
  • Heavy yard work (i.e.: continuous digging or hoeing)
  • Tennis (singles)
  • Cycling 10 miles per hour or faster
  • Jumping rope

5 Simple Tips:

 

  • Exercise before bedtime for better sleep
  • Take a brisk walk after dinner
  • Watch one less television show before bed
  • Walk 3 hours per week to help lower risk of stroke
  • Get 7-8 hours’ sleep at night

 

 

One of the hardest habits to develop is the habit of making self-care our top priority.  We are taught to believe that prioritizing self-care is selfish.  It is not.  If we are not healthy in our mind, spirit, and body, we are not good for anybody.  Always putting the needs of demanding children, spouses, work, friends, community, homes, possessions, and commitments, over caring for ourselves only leads to our burn out.  When we fly in an airplane, the attendants direct us to put the oxygen mask on ourselves first in an emergency. They do not direct us to put the mask on our child first, or our parent, or our spouse, or our friend. If we are not operating at our highest possible potential, we could fail in our efforts to help our child, our spouse, our parent, or our friend, which could prove fatal to all parties, including us!

 

Take time for just YOU every day. It does not have to be much, but it must be consistent. Create an environment that prohibits you from ignoring or forgetting your self-care. What does that look like?  

Here are a few ideas:

 

  • Make an appointment or date with yourself and block out time, just as you would for your Loved one, friend, or client. Do not cancel it, reschedule it, or be late for any reason. Doing this on a daily or weekly basis will effectively and powerfully raise your knowing of how interesting, able, valuable, and worthy you truly are.  Time with yourself is equally, if not more, important as time with the doctor, the mechanic, the friend, the counselor, the child, the stylist.  And something you will learn from this is that you are all those people for yourself.  You just do not know it yet.

 

  • Activate the “Do Not Disturb” mode in your life. This can be a part of the appointment referred to above, or in addition to.  Disconnect for a short duration every day. Turn your cell phone off and leave it in the car, workplace, or home.  You can catch up on those emails, internet searches, texts, phone calls, in person conversations, and social media alerts when you are done with your “do not disturb” period. Tell your family, friend, spouse, co-worker, or roommate that you are not going to be available or accessible for a period and be specific if you need to.  The world will still revolve.  If you need help, there is actually a program called Freedom, which—depending on whether you need to increase your productivity, or your self-connection—is a self-managing mechanism that blocks you from social media sites, email, or the web.  When you activate the “Do Not Disturb” mode in your life, make sure you include a physical sign on the outside of your door to remind others, and on the inside of the door to remind yourself.

 

  • Turn off the action of the world, your routine, and your habitual responses to engage with people and the busyness of the world. Sit in a quiet place. Create a space that is just for you to be. Just sit, relax, and breathe. Allow yourself to not do  Allow yourself to just be.

 

  • Take a walk. And do not just walk.  Notice the natural elements and beauty around you.  Do not use ear buds. You will miss sounds of the breezes, water flowing, and the many birds and critters that sing and communicate with one another. Hearing those sounds keeps you in the earthly, energizing magic of the moment.

 

  • Stretch, do yoga, or move your body in some way. Movement releases endorphins, raises your emotions, clears your mind, creates more flexibility and coordination, activates the lymphatic system to release toxins, aids arthritis and inflammation, relieves pain, and improves your blood circulation.  It does not have to be full or hard-core sport or exercise, just movement.  Twist, jump, turn, squat, bend, flow, stretch, hold a pose, flex each body part.

 

  • Spend time in nature, whether it is at the ocean, in the mountains, in the sand dunes, in a field of flowers, walking barefoot on the grass, or just walking around a peaceful pretty neighborhood.  It has been shown that being in nature connects you to the earth and helps ground you. Lay on the earth, sand, grass, flowers, or blanket. Stepping away from the concrete, the technology jungle, and the communication web, and surrounding yourself with nature has a way of centering you back to YOU and connects you to Spirit and the Oneness of the Universe. Wonder. Feel. Touch. Smell. Inhale. Listen. Taste. Breathe. Appreciate. Nature has a way of speaking to you if you are willing to listen.

 

  • Meditate for a few minutes. Fifteen minutes of focused meditation is enough to create a lasting shift and feel more centered, relaxed, and focused.

 

  • Listen to your favorite music.  Get lost in it. Do whatever the music inspires you to do. Cook, draw, color, journal, clean, create, repair, clear, dance, sing.  You can even choose the type of music to listen to that will set the mood for the activity you want to do, even inactivity.

 

  • Take a nap, or rest and close your eyes, or read a book or magazine. Even a 20-minute nap pushes the reset button and gives you an entirely new start position and frame of mind.

 

  •  Singing can turn an awful day into a fun, energized, inspired day.

 

  • Remember that every dark, down, difficult time in life is temporary.  Everything changes, sometimes in as little as five minutes.

 

  • Keep it simple. Self-care does not have to be complicated. The simpler it is, the better and easier it will be for you to do it regularly. Change it up.  Try each of the above suggestions, and alternate.  It does not matter so much which one you do, only that you consistently do something.

 

  • Reward yourself for sticking to your new routine. By taking care of yourself first, and on a consistent–if not daily–basis, you will feel better about yourself and life in general, and you will become better for those around you. You will be glad you did. You will find that you are better able to create the energy to balance your emotions and navigate the circumstances in your life. You may even become addicted, and that kind of addiction is a positive, life-enhancing one!

 

 

 

Here is an exercise to help you get clarity on your mental, physical, and emotional health and energy.

 

Note each one of your actions for the next seven days and nights.  Do not leave any details out, not even things you might be embarrassed about.  No one will look at this, except you.  Write down everything you do from the moment you wake up (even before you get out of bed) until the moment you fall asleep for seven days.

 

When your seven days of notes are complete, fold a new sheet of paper in half, lengthwise.  At the top of the right side, write “ME.”  At the top of the left side, write “OTHERS.”  Next, review the past week’s notes.  For each instance in which you gave to others, write a hash mark on the left side of the new sheet of paper, and for each instance in which you gave to yourself, write a hash mark on the right side of the new sheet of paper.  Total your hash marks on each side.  Compare the types and qualities of actions and the time involved for each.  Notice how you feel and what you realize.

 

Your final list will be predominantly dedicated to others.  That is expected. But I want you to pay attention to how much time you dedicated to yourself that week. What counts is quality, not quantity. Identifying that you played ten hours of video games is not the same as five hours of self-care—time connecting with yourself with no distractions. If you had little or no self-care or self-quiet or rest time, determine how you can create that in the next seven days.  Then, notice any difference in the way you feel, your energy level, your clarity, or your awareness. 

 

This exercise will help you identify where you are draining yourself for other people, external commitments, and excessive external actions and enable you to balance yourself, your health, and your life.  Knowledge is the key to change, and action is power.  If you do not know it is broken, you cannot fix it.  Your spirit needs attention, to maintain mental, emotional, and physical health—and you deserve it.

 

 

Many religions say that the body was created form the earth and will return to the earth when its time is done.  Let us not wait until our death and burial to connect our bodies with mother earth. Establish a regular connection with nature, even if it is just 20 minutes a day. Take time right now.  Go outside.  Move your body.  Rest your body.  Nourish your body, mind, and spirit.  Disconnect from all distraction of this modern day fast paced world and the people in it.  Your body temple will reflect to you the nurturing you have given it. Your spirit will thank you.  

 

We are not human beings here to create a spiritual experience.  We are spiritual beings here to have a human experience, but our source of fuel, inspiration, energy, drive, focus, joy, Love, and passion always comes from our spiritual essence. That is our lifeline.  Nurturing our spiritual essence means taking time to recharge and replenish. Being present with ourselves and our natural surroundings enables our bodies to release the stress, tension, tightness, and accumulated electrical charges from the world, The more we do this, the more our bodies will shift and adjust themselves toward healing, sustaining, and strengthening, not only our physical bodies, but our mental and emotional bodies—our true body temples.

blank

Treat your body like a temple, not a woodshed.

The mind and body work together.

Your body needs to be a good support system for the mind and spirit.

If you take good care of it, your body can take you wherever you want to go,

with the power, strength, energy, and vitality you will need to get there.

 

— Jim Rohn

 

Religious and spiritual references abound that refer to the body as a temple, a holy place, a place of reverence, respect, and beauty.  But what does that really mean?

 

A temple is a dwelling place for God(s), Spirit, Source, Creator of all that is.  A temple is a sacred revered place, holding the spirit of God. As we are spiritual beings having a human experience, our physical bodies are the housing of our spiritual essence, the place we have chosen to take residence in for our brief time on the earthly plane, where we take comfort, rest, integrate life’s experiences, expand, celebrate, and nurture ourselves.

 

If I walked into a temple that was dirty, smelly, broken down, decaying, or filled with trash bags of fat, sugars, and waste, I’d get out as fast as my legs could take me.  So, why do we treat our bodies like disposable trash bags?

 

According to the article, “Obesity Rates & Trends Overview,” on Stateofobesity.org, “Obesity rates vary state-to-state, but remain high nationwide. Across the United States, more than 1 in 3 adults and 1 in 6 children (ages 2-19) are obese, and 1 in 11 young children (ages 2-5) are obese.”  300,000,000 people around the world suffer from depression, according to the World Health Organization, and 16.2 million adults in the United States (6.7% of adults in the US) have experienced a major depressive episode in the past year.  One third of Americans are obese, and nearly 7% suffer from depression.  Why?

 

If you were allowed only one car to last your entire life, would you fill it with bad fluids, put on old tires, use low quality parts, fill it with trash, or toxic chemicals?  No.  You would use only the best products you could find to keep it in top shape.  You would make every effort to keep it clean, neat, pristine, and well maintained for optimum performance and durability.  You would do everything in your power to make sure it would last for your entire life, wouldn’t you?

 

You only get one body to last your entire life.  If you wear out your body, where are you going to live?

— Joseph Binning

 

Countless published studies show that the foods, drinks, medications, and substances we put into our mouths directly result in our record numbers of illnesses. It’s not just the type of food we eat, but also the chemicals used to mass produce, preserve, and artificially structure and design them to attract us—and addict us. These chemicals, including artificial and animal hormones, preservatives, artificial colors, thickening agents, dyes, waxes, artificial fragrances, conditioners, bonders, artificial sweeteners, genetic modifiers, pesticides, antibiotics, weed killers, and many others are being ingested by us, and our Loved ones, every day. Our body temples were not designed to ingest or digest any of these, which is evident in the increasing numbers and varieties of health addictions and body afflictions.

Front Desk Position Opening!

According to Chapter 2 of the United States Department of Agriculture Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015-2010 Eighth Edition, (https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/), our current typical eating patterns in the United States do not align with the healthy Dietary Guidelines, as shown in the chart below.  About three-fourths of the population has an eating pattern that is low in vegetables, fruits, dairy, and oils.  More than half of the population is meeting or exceeding total grain and total protein foods recommendations but are not meeting the recommendations for the subgroups within each of these food groups.

 

Most Americans exceed the recommendations for added sugars, saturated fats, and sodium.  In addition, the eating patterns of many Americans are too high in calories. Calorie intake over time, in comparison to calorie needs, is best evaluated by measuring body weight status. The high percentage of the overweight or obese population suggests that many over-consume.  More than two-thirds of all adults and nearly one-third of all children and youth in the United States are either overweight or obese.

 

 

As a young man and Ironman triathlon participant, I believed in a healthy diet as a standard part of my life.  My motto was, “If it comes in a box, bag, or Styrofoam, I don’t eat it.”  My typical routine was train most of the year, except during the period from Thanksgiving until after the new year, when I rewarded myself for all the months of training and discipline.  Upon resuming training after the new year, I consumed a high protein diet for a few weeks, shed the extra pounds I had gained during the holiday break, and then continued as normal—my normal.  One year I noticed that I kept losing the weight, even after I stopped eating the high protein diet. I began to appear sick-looking to my friends. I was not a person who sought the care of a physician, but I did at that point.

 

I was shocked when the doctor and lab results diagnosed me with Type 2 Diabetes based on the results of a blood test that measures the A1C levels and how well the body is naturally producing insulin. The higher the number, the less the body is producing.   Level 6 is safe.  Mine was 12.  I was told that, because I had a First Nation Osage American Indian blood in my heritage, Type 2 Diabetes was in my genes and that it was not unusual to be symptom free until later in life.

 

My treatment protocol: Insulin three times a day; Metformin twice a day; antidepressants twice a day; heart medication; liver medication; and anti-inflammatory medication for the swelling in my feet. Being sick and diseased is not cheap. I began running again, six days a week and reduced my number to a “safe” level.  The problem did not go away.  It just became hidden, less easy to detect.  Fast forward and one hip injury later, my A1C levels were back, at 9.

 

It was at that point that I was asked to watch Forks Over Knives, a now world-famous documentary highlighting the benefits of a whole food and plant-based diet. After seeing it and doing my own research, I decided to take the leap.  I abandoned all processed foods, all meats of any kind, and all dairy. Within two and a half months—without exercise—I reduced my A1C levels to 6.5.  At 6.5, you are considered non-diabetic. I have since started exercising again and have every belief in my A1C levels reaching below 6

 

The modern-day lifestyle for most Americans is a sedentary one of restricted movement. Most of us drive everywhere, rather than walk or bike, and most of us do only the bare minimum of exercise, or none at all. According to a new study by the Center for Disease Control, only one out of every five American meets the minimum weekly exercise standards recommended.  Thus, the eighty percent who do not are setting themselves up for the potential of years of health problems. https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2013/p0502-physical-activity.html

The U.S. government recommends that adults have 2 – 2 ½ hours per week of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise, or 1 ¼ hour of vigorous-intensity activity, or a combination of both, as well as a minimum of 2 muscle-strengthening activities per week, such as lifting weights or doing push-ups.

 

Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) analyzed survey data collected from random phone calls to more than 450,000 Americans, aged eighteen and older.  When asked how often and for how long they engaged in aerobic physical activity, outside of their jobs, the data revealed that only 20.6% met the total recommended amounts of exercise—approximately 23% of the men and 18% of the women surveyed. Those who engaged in the most physical activity—nearly 31%—were between the ages of eighteen and twenty-four.  Those who exercised the least—nearly 16%—were age sixty-five and older.

 

If you see yourself in any of the statistics, are you ready and willing to change your stats and take care of your one-in-a-lifetime body temple?

 

The following benefits, recommendations, descriptions, and tips are from the American Heart Association.

 

7 Important Benefits from getting the proper amount of exercise:

 

  • Lower risk for: heart disease; stroke; Type 2 Diabetes; high blood pressure; dementia and Alzheimer’s; several types of cancer, and some complications of pregnancy
  • Better sleep, including improvements in insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea
  • Improved cognition, including memory, attention, and processing speed
  • Less weight gain, obesity, and weight related chronic health conditions
  • Better bone health and balance and less risk of injury from falls
  • Fewer symptoms of depression and anxiety
  • Better quality of life and sense of overall well-being

 

Recommendations for Physical Activity for Adults:

 

  • Get at least 2 ½ hours per week of moderate-intensity aerobic activity, or 1 ¼ hour per week of vigorous aerobic activity, or a combination of both, preferably spread throughout the week.
  • Add moderate- to high-intensity muscle-strengthening activity (such as resistance or weights) at least 2 days per week.
  • Spend less time sitting. Even light-intensity activity can offset some of the risks of being sedentary.
  • Gain even more benefits by being active at least 5 hours per week.
  • Increase amount and intensity gradually over time.

Recommendations for Physical Activity for Kids:

  • Children 3-5 years old need to be physically active and have plenty of opportunities to move throughout the day.
  • Kids aged 6-17 need at least 1 hour per day of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity, mostly aerobic.
  • Include vigorous-intensity activity at least 3 days per week.
  • Include muscle- and bone-strengthening (weight-bearing) activities at least 3 days per week.
  • Increase amount and intensity gradually over time.

Physical Activity is anything that moves our body and burns calories. This includes things like walking, climbing stairs and stretching.

Aerobic Activity, aka cardio, gets the heart rate up and benefiting by improving cardio-respiratory fitness. When done at moderate intensity, the heart will beat faster, and you will breathe harder than normal, but you will still be able to talk. Think of it as a medium or moderate amount of effort. Vigorous intensity activities will push your body a little further. They will require a higher amount of effort. You will probably get warm and begin to sweat. You will not be able to talk much without getting out of breath.

For maximum benefits, include both moderate- and vigorous-intensity activity in your routine, along with strengthening and stretching exercises. Knowing your heart rate will also help you track the intensity of the activity.

 

Moderate-Intensity Aerobic Activities:

 

  • Brisk walking (at least 2.5 miles per hour)
  • Water aerobics
  • Dancing (ballroom or social)
  • Gardening
  • Tennis (doubles)
  • Biking slower than 10 miles per hour

Vigorous-Intensity Aerobic Activities:

 

  • Hiking uphill or with a heavy backpack
  • Running
  • Swimming laps
  • Aerobic dancing
  • Heavy yard work (i.e.: continuous digging or hoeing)
  • Tennis (singles)
  • Cycling 10 miles per hour or faster
  • Jumping rope

5 Simple Tips:

 

  • Exercise before bedtime for better sleep
  • Take a brisk walk after dinner
  • Watch one less television show before bed
  • Walk 3 hours per week to help lower risk of stroke
  • Get 7-8 hours’ sleep at night

 

 

One of the hardest habits to develop is the habit of making self-care our top priority.  We are taught to believe that prioritizing self-care is selfish.  It is not.  If we are not healthy in our mind, spirit, and body, we are not good for anybody.  Always putting the needs of demanding children, spouses, work, friends, community, homes, possessions, and commitments, over caring for ourselves only leads to our burn out.  When we fly in an airplane, the attendants direct us to put the oxygen mask on ourselves first in an emergency. They do not direct us to put the mask on our child first, or our parent, or our spouse, or our friend. If we are not operating at our highest possible potential, we could fail in our efforts to help our child, our spouse, our parent, or our friend, which could prove fatal to all parties, including us!

 

Take time for just YOU every day. It does not have to be much, but it must be consistent. Create an environment that prohibits you from ignoring or forgetting your self-care. What does that look like?

 

Here are a few ideas:

 

  • Make an appointment or date with yourself and block out time, just as you would for your Loved one, friend, or client. Do not cancel it, reschedule it, or be late for any reason. Doing this on a daily or weekly basis will effectively and powerfully raise your knowing of how interesting, able, valuable, and worthy you truly are.  Time with yourself is equally, if not more, important as time with the doctor, the mechanic, the friend, the counselor, the child, the stylist.  And something you will learn from this is that you are all those people for yourself.  You just do not know it yet.

 

  • Activate the “Do Not Disturb” mode in your life. This can be a part of the appointment referred to above, or in addition to.  Disconnect for a short duration every day. Turn your cell phone off and leave it in the car, workplace, or home.  You can catch up on those emails, internet searches, texts, phone calls, in person conversations, and social media alerts when you are done with your “do not disturb” period. Tell your family, friend, spouse, co-worker, or roommate that you are not going to be available or accessible for a period and be specific if you need to.  The world will still revolve.  If you need help, there is actually a program called Freedom, which—depending on whether you need to increase your productivity, or your self-connection—is a self-managing mechanism that blocks you from social media sites, email, or the web.  When you activate the “Do Not Disturb” mode in your life, make sure you include a physical sign on the outside of your door to remind others, and on the inside of the door to remind yourself.

 

  • Turn off the action of the world, your routine, and your habitual responses to engage with people and the busyness of the world. Sit in a quiet place. Create a space that is just for you to be. Just sit, relax, and breathe. Allow yourself to not do  Allow yourself to just be.

 

  • Take a walk. And do not just walk.  Notice the natural elements and beauty around you.  Do not use ear buds. You will miss sounds of the breezes, water flowing, and the many birds and critters that sing and communicate with one another. Hearing those sounds keeps you in the earthly, energizing magic of the moment.

 

  • Stretch, do yoga, or move your body in some way. Movement releases endorphins, raises your emotions, clears your mind, creates more flexibility and coordination, activates the lymphatic system to release toxins, aids arthritis and inflammation, relieves pain, and improves your blood circulation.  It does not have to be full or hard-core sport or exercise, just movement.  Twist, jump, turn, squat, bend, flow, stretch, hold a pose, flex each body part.

 

  • Spend time in nature, whether it is at the ocean, in the mountains, in the sand dunes, in a field of flowers, walking barefoot on the grass, or just walking around a peaceful pretty neighborhood.  It has been shown that being in nature connects you to the earth and helps ground you. Lay on the earth, sand, grass, flowers, or blanket. Stepping away from the concrete, the technology jungle, and the communication web, and surrounding yourself with nature has a way of centering you back to YOU and connects you to Spirit and the Oneness of the Universe. Wonder. Feel. Touch. Smell. Inhale. Listen. Taste. Breathe. Appreciate. Nature has a way of speaking to you if you are willing to listen.

 

  • Meditate for a few minutes. Fifteen minutes of focused meditation is enough to create a lasting shift and feel more centered, relaxed, and focused.

 

  • Listen to your favorite music.  Get lost in it. Do whatever the music inspires you to do. Cook, draw, color, journal, clean, create, repair, clear, dance, sing.  You can even choose the type of music to listen to that will set the mood for the activity you want to do, even inactivity.

 

  • Take a nap, or rest and close your eyes, or read a book or magazine. Even a 20-minute nap pushes the reset button and gives you an entirely new start position and frame of mind.

 

  •  Singing can turn an awful day into a fun, energized, inspired day.

 

  • Remember that every dark, down, difficult time in life is temporary.  Everything changes, sometimes in as little as five minutes.

 

  • Keep it simple. Self-care does not have to be complicated. The simpler it is, the better and easier it will be for you to do it regularly. Change it up.  Try each of the above suggestions, and alternate.  It does not matter so much which one you do, only that you consistently do something.

 

  • Reward yourself for sticking to your new routine. By taking care of yourself first, and on a consistent–if not daily–basis, you will feel better about yourself and life in general, and you will become better for those around you. You will be glad you did. You will find that you are better able to create the energy to balance your emotions and navigate the circumstances in your life. You may even become addicted, and that kind of addiction is a positive, life-enhancing one

 

 

 

Here is an exercise to help you get clarity on your mental, physical, and emotional health and energy.

 

Note each one of your actions for the next seven days and nights.  Do not leave any details out, not even things you might be embarrassed about.  No one will look at this, except you.  Write down everything you do from the moment you wake up (even before you get out of bed) until the moment you fall asleep for seven days.

 

When your seven days of notes are complete, fold a new sheet of paper in half, lengthwise.  At the top of the right side, write “ME.”  At the top of the left side, write “OTHERS.”  Next, review the past week’s notes.  For each instance in which you gave to others, write a hash mark on the left side of the new sheet of paper, and for each instance in which you gave to yourself, write a hash mark on the right side of the new sheet of paper.  Total your hash marks on each side.  Compare the types and qualities of actions and the time involved for each.  Notice how you feel and what you realize.

 

Your final list will be predominantly dedicated to others.  That is expected. But I want you to pay attention to how much time you dedicated to yourself that week. What counts is quality, not quantity. Identifying that you played ten hours of video games is not the same as five hours of self-care—time connecting with yourself with no distractions. If you had little or no self-care or self-quiet or rest time, determine how you can create that in the next seven days.  Then, notice any difference in the way you feel, your energy level, your clarity, or your awareness.

 

This exercise will help you identify where you are draining yourself for other people, external commitments, and excessive external actions and enable you to balance yourself, your health, and your life.  Knowledge is the key to change, and action is power.  If you do not know it is broken, you cannot fix it.  Your spirit needs attention, to maintain mental, emotional, and physical health—and you deserve it.

 

 

Many religions say that the body was created form the earth and will return to the earth when its time is done.  Let us not wait until our death and burial to connect our bodies with mother earth. Establish a regular connection with nature, even if it is just 20 minutes a day. Take time right now.  Go outside.  Move your body.  Rest your body.  Nourish your body, mind, and spirit.  Disconnect from all distraction of this modern day fast paced world and the people in it.  Your body temple will reflect to you the nurturing you have given it. Your spirit will thank you.

 

We are not human beings here to create a spiritual experience.  We are spiritual beings here to have a human experience, but our source of fuel, inspiration, energy, drive, focus, joy, Love, and passion always comes from our spiritual essence. That is our lifeline.  Nurturing our spiritual essence means taking time to recharge and replenish. Being present with ourselves and our natural surroundings enables our bodies to release the stress, tension, tightness, and accumulated electrical charges from the world, The more we do this, the more our bodies will shift and adjust themselves toward healing, sustaining, and strengthening, not only our physical bodies, but our mental and emotional bodies—our true body temples.

There are many aspects of success; material wealth is only one component.

Success also includes good health, energy, and enthusiasm for life,

 fulfilling relationships, creative freedom, emotional and psychological stability,

a sense of well-being, and peace of mind.

 

— Deepak Chopra

 

What is a success to you?  Is your level of success determined, in part or all, by others, including those who Love or respect you? 

 

The media—including social media—sells us a version of what we have come to believe as success:  wealth; fame; material possessions; a million dollar company; vacationing in exotic parts of the world; a glamorous or state-of-the-art home; property ownership; a large following; tons of friends; a familiar face; a confident persona; a recognizable brand.  Many marketing pitches tag a well-known person or celebrity as the image of success.

 

None of these versions are, by definition, wrong, but if you have not achieved what is on the list, does that mean you are unsuccessful?  If you have not achieved what is on the list, are you lazy, incompetent, or less valuable?  Are you a loser?  No, you are not!

 

We see people who seem to have everything associated with success and, yet they are miserable, or seem to be wearing a mask.  We even see some commit suicide.  It shocks us.  We ask why?  Didn’t they have it all?  Were they not happy?  

 

Perhaps they were not as happy as they wanted us to believe.  Perhaps they pursued someone else’s dream life, someone else’s version of success.  Perhaps, the success they have is not in alignment with their core values, their desires.  Perhaps what they had to do to get there made them become someone who they never wanted to be? When they got to the top of the mountain, they discovered that they were just alone, high on a hill with lots of money, no genuine friends, and no joy.  Perhaps they discovered they were living a lie and suddenly woke from the illusion of a life that was all created for the attention and approval of someone else.  Perhaps the Love, recognition, support, or happiness they thought would make them feel better did not make them feel better after all.  What happened?  Where did they go wrong?

 

As children, tor teachers en-grain in us various definitions, examples, and expectations of success.  We integrate those into our belief systems and live our entire lives by them:  First place, or no place; Best in class, or no class; Biggest, strongest, fastest, or worthless.  “My parents won’t be happy unless I’m a doctor.” Yet you secretly desire to be a painter. But what if they were all wrong?

 

Sometimes the wrong examples, expectations, or guidelines comes to us when we are young, and we do not understand how to direct our own desires and envision our own futures.  We may live most, or all, of our lives in uncertainty about how to create our own success, and even how to be happy. 

 

No one has the power to impose any definition or expectation of success on you, except you.  Everyone looks at success through different lenses.  You cannot measure my success by your success because we have walked two different roads, sought unique things, formed unique values, and taken unique journeys.  It is important to understand that what makes someone you know happy might not make you happy, because you are as different as snowflakes.  We find the path to success by asking ourselves, “What makes ME happy?” You can only define the definition of success for you based on what you want and see as a success, not what someone else sees or wants for you.  A fascinating fact is some of the greatest successes resulted from the worst failures. Did You Know any of these interesting facts?

 

  • They turned Walt Disney down over 300 times before a banker saw his vision of Disneyland
  • Colonel Sanders started Kentucky Fried Chicken when he was in his 60s
  • Michael Jordan was told he was too short to play basketball
  • Abraham Lincoln lost his race for State Legislature.
  • Lost his bid to become Speaker of the House.
  • Lost his race for Congress.
  • Lost his race for the US Senate, not once but twice.
  • Lost the nomination of Vice President.
  • Failed in business.
  • All before becoming a sitting US President

 

It is essential to believe in our ability and right to experience a life that feels successful, whatever we want that to look and feel like. It is imperative to know that we are born to succeed in life. If we believe that we are not successful, based on comparing ourselves to someone else’s standards, goals, opinions, or achievements, we can never feel successful.

 

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Ask yourself these questions and write the answers:

 

  • Is my success defined by others’ opinions of me?
  • Is my success defined by what others say about me?
  • Is my success defined by how others feel about me?
  • Is my success defined by how others treat or act around me?
  • Is my success defined by what I have accomplished in life?
  • Is my success defined by what I possess?
  • Is my success defined by what trophies, awards, certificates, medals, and acknowledgments I have?
  • Is my success defined by how much I can leave to my fans, followers, or admirers?
  • What do I consider success for me, personally?
  • In what ways have I designed my life?
  • What things did I desire that I got or now have?
  • In what areas have I achieved success?
  • In what ways have I been successful?
  • In what ways am I feeling success in my life?
  • How does success feel to me?
  • How do I continue to build on that?
  • What have I learned about me from my successes?
  • What have I learned about life from my successes?

 

One of my favorite authors, Jim Rohn, said, “If you don’t design your own life plan to be a success, chances are you will fall into someone else’s plan. And guess what someone else has planned for your success? Not much.”

 

If we don’t ask the hard questions, we might wind up climbing someone else’s ladder, or pursuing someone else’s version of success, only to find out later that we had the ladder leaned against the wrong building, or we used the wrong ladder, or we never needed a ladder to get what we wanted.

 

 

Success is not final; failure is not final. It is the courage to continue that counts.

 

—Winston Churchill

 

 

How can you redefine your version of success, so you can achieve it? 

 

Success starts with a prepared mindset.  Start with what makes you YOU, and what brings you the most excitement, the most joy, and the deepest fulfillment. 

 

  • Start with what you already excel at, or have a tranquil time doing, or focus on when you do not even realize it. Take note on those things and determine where you want to go with them from there. 
  • Then make a realistic plan. Start small enough so it feels easy and good, and you know you can do it.
  • Then expand your plan, keeping it aligned with your vision, who you believe you are, and what you hold as your truth.
  • Get a mentor or guide. Find someone you see as having the version of success you desire and ask them to mentor or coach you. Most successful people genuinely want success for others and genuinely want to help.
  • Remain clear, certain, and inspired enough that you stay focused and determined. Stay on your plan, no matter how slow, and do not quit until you get what you want.
  • Ignore the naysayers and the distractions. Only surround yourself with believers, positive go-getters, and creative manifesters.  Remember that words, and the beliefs behind words, are powerful creative energy.  Whether you say you can, or you say you cannot, you are right.

 

You can tell the size of a person’s dream, by how little it takes to take it away.

— Joseph Binning

 

Do not wait for a more convenient, or proper time. There is no greater power than moving forward in the moment of the inspired desire. Do it when the energy is ripe, when the impulse hits you, when the match is hot. Do whatever it takes. It is your life.  It is your dream.  It is your desire.  It is your success.  Believe in it.  Believe in YOU. You are the best investment you can ever invest in.  Dream.  Dream of a better YOU.  Make your dream HUGE.  Remember, you can tell the size of a person’s dream by how little it takes to take it away. Decide YOU are worth it. You deserve the best YOU.  We deserve the best YOU.  You are born to succeed because you are great!

 

Some of my favorite success quotes to inspire you:

 

Start where you stand, work with whatever tools you may have at your command,

and you will find better tools as you go along.

— Napoleon Hill

 

Develop success from failures. Discouragement and failure are two of the surest steppingstones to success.

—Dale Carnegie

 

Try not to become a person of success, try rather to become a person of value.

—Albert Einstein

 

Measure Success not so much by the position that one has reached in life

as by the obstacles which one has overcome while trying to succeed.

—Booker T. Washington

 

Failure is the condiment that gives success its flavor.

—Truman Capote

 

The talent of success is nothing more than doing what you can do well.

—Henry W. Longfellow

 

I don’t measure a man’s success by how high he climbs, but by how high he bounces when he hits bottom.

—George S. Patton

 

Success is a science; if you have the right conditions, you get the result.

—Oscar Wilde

 

Action is the foundational key to success.

—Pablo Picasso

 

Success usually comes to those who are too busy to be looking for it.

—Henry David Thoreau

 

 The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second-best time is now.

—Chinese Proverb

 

 

Many of life’s failures stop people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up.

—Thomas A. Edison

 

Always remember your own resolution to success is more important than any other one thing.

—Abraham Lincoln

 

The secret to success is to do the common thing uncommonly well.

John D. Rockefeller Jr.

 

All successful men have agreed to one thing: they were causationists. They believed that things went not by luck, but by law; that there was not a weak, or a cracked link in the chain that joins the first and last of things.

—Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

The secret of success is to know something nobody else knows.

—Aristotle Onassis

 

Successful people maintain a positive focus in life no matter what is going on around them. They stay focused on their past successes rather than their past failures, and on the next action steps they need to take to get them closer to fulfilling of their goals rather than all the other distractions that life presents to them.

—Jack Canfield

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The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands

in moments of comfort and convenience,

but where he stands in times of challenge and controversy.

The true neighbor will risk his position, his prestige,

and even his life for the welfare of others.

In dangerous valleys and hazardous pathways,

he will lift some bruised and beaten brother to a higher and more noble life.

 

— Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

Most people react to life. We make plans and line everything up, so things will go exactly right… and BAM!  Life happens.

 

It is frustrating when our plans go wrong. So, we make a joke and say something like, “Time for Plan B.”  Plan B comes in handy sometimes, but life is not about Plan B. Life is about witnessing your life from the back of your eyes, instead of the front.

 

When we witness life from the front, we are fully invested in a specific thing happening, doing our best to control the outcome. “If I wear this blouse, he’ll notice me…. If I stay late and get this report done, I might get that raise…. If I throw the ball every day, I can make the All Stars.” Are we really controlling the outcomes?  Have we ever?

 

If you think you are in control of your life, ask the sun to come up an hour later, so you can sleep in.

 

— Dr. Wayne Dyer

 

 

When we view life from the back of our eyes, as spectators, rather than manipulate, strategize, or force things, we observe what is happening from us. Before we can change our lives, or in our behaviors, we must be able to observe what and how our mind is thinking, believing, and rationalizing.  To do that, we must look deep within ourselves. We must ask ourselves the questions.  We must be a witness to ourselves.

 

How to Start Being a Witness to Yourself

 

  • Track what is going on in your mind.  What are your thoughts when something happens?  Where did those thoughts come from? Ask yourself, “Why am I thinking this way? What prompted that thought? Do I believe that thought?”  

 

  • Track your behaviors and actions.  What did you do before, after, and because of something happening?  Ask yourself, “Why did I do that?  Did I do that randomly, or on autopilot, or by clear intention?  If I thought about it now, would I have done the same thing?  Why, or why not?”

 

  • Track your verbal responses and patterns.  Ask yourself, “Why am I saying these things?  What motivated me to say that?  Do I have a pattern of these kinds of verbal responses?”  

 

  • Track your feelings associated with what is happening. Ask yourself, “Why am I feeling this way? Does this feel familiar?  Is there something deeper that I am not attending to, or feeling comfortable enough to express?  Why?”

 

  • Take responsibility for your emotional health.
    Whether you react in a way you believe to be positive or negative, or whether you do not react at all, your emotional reaction is yours, and yours alone. Only you control how you feel. No one can make you react in a specific emotional manner, unless they are physically hurting you, or threatening to hurt you.  Ask yourself, “Why am I reacting this way? Is this typical of me?  When and/or where did I first start reacting like this?”
    Your emotions are a product of you and your experiences, beliefs, and choices. 

 

  • Beliefs create feelings.

          Feelings create emotion. Emotion creates action. Action creates habits. Study your emotions.  

          Know them.  Change the roots of them and own them.

 

  • Focus on what feels best to you or what you want to focus on and make a note of the other thoughts and areas that compete for your focus, to come back to them later.  
    You cannot think of two things at the same time and focus mentally, physically, and emotionally on both. Clear your mind and ask yourself, “What do I want to do, say, be, or experience in this moment?”

 

  • Be present.  
    No matter where you are, be there. You cannot observe yourself if you are not presently connected mentally, emotionally, and energetically. When you walk, look at where you are, not down or off in the distance. You never know what you might miss. If you struggle with this, ask yourself: “Why am I not here?  Why am I not listening or paying attention to where I am?  Am I uncomfortable, afraid, bored, conflicted? Am I needing to be somewhere else or take care of something else that is more important?  Why did I commit to being there instead of here?”

 

 

  • Create a “Feeling and Thought Observation Journal.”
    Understanding what you do and why you do it is difficult, especially if you continue to make excuses for your actions and words.  Seek to know why you do not understand, by looking at the feeling associated with each of your behaviors. We attach your feelings that prompt you to behave in a way that to something that is subconsciously protecting you, blocking you, soothing you, or no longer serving you. Take a minute to reflect on the day.  Ask yourself, “What happened? Where was I?  Who was I with?” 

 

  • With each circumstance that comes to mind, write what you thought.

         Why did you say or do something?  Why did you feel that way? Recall the emotions that caused you to react or make the choices you did.  Be honest.

          After a brief time, you may notice patterns. Over time, you may realize something for the first time, or remember something you had forgotten.

         Address your discoveries in small bites.  Remember that it takes three weeks of doing something new for it to become a habit, either good or bad.

 

  • Notice when you feel the need or desire to changeyour mind, your belief, your behavior, your desire. Notice how you are feeling, what thoughts are new, what needs, and desires are propelling you to want to do something differently.  Then follow that inspiration to make the change. Or, maybe you have already made a change, but you are realizing it after the fact, because you were not consciously aware at the time that you were changing.

 

  • Congratulate yourself for making the change.  

          Or, notice when you think you must make a change, but are not making it. 

         Ask yourself, “Why am I not making that change? Why am I resisting?” 

         Write all your thoughts and feelings surrounding that topic and your responses, or lack of responses, in your journal.

  

  • Become the observer of how well and how often you open yourself to receive.  
    Do you continually put out, give, extend, and spend your energy, time, resources, or knowledge outward or to others, but rarely allow yourself to receive?  

 

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Here is an exercise to help you to learn to be a witness to your life:

Fold a paper lengthwise into 3 sections. 

In the first section, note how many times per day or week you have pleased, said yes, or given to others. 

In the second section, note how many times you have pleased, said yes, and given to yourself.

 
In the third section, note how many times you have said yes to receiving from others.

 
This includes, compliments, money, gifts, time, food, kindness, help, praise, nurturing, services, products, ideas, contributions, work, support, listening, and caring for.

 

 
Compare the three sections.  If you observe an imbalance, in any of the areas, think on that.  Notice how that makes you feel and that perhaps you are not feeling as good as you can.

 

 

Be patient with yourself and your process, as if you are teaching a young child.  
Connect with your inner guidance.  Observe yourself.  Listen.  Feel.  Write.  Watch the cues.  Do not put pressure or weight on yourself with limits, assessments, and judgments of yourself.  Know that you are a work in progress.  Sometimes, the only thing that is holding you back is a little more time, or the right time.  Write, “I am a work in progress.”

 

 

Reward yourself as if you are both your teacher and your student, your parent, and your child.  
Watch and celebrate each step in your progress and ability to witness each victory, great and small. 
Create a Victory Journal, or a section in your Feelings and Thoughts Observations Journal where you note each of your victories and accomplishments.  

 

Let your increasing awareness inspire you to continue. 

The more aware you become, through witnessing yourself, the better you will start to feel on a day-to-day basis.  The lifting of stress and suffering and the expanding happiness and light will be your ongoing reward.

 

 

Be a witness to your growth, evolution, awakening, and blossoming.  
Look back at yourself, and in your journals of your thoughts, beliefs, behaviors, feelings, observations, and victories. Feel the difference from your earlier notes to your current notes.  See how your feelings about yourself and about life have changed.  Feel your goodness.  Appreciate all the witnessing, writing questions, and self-discovery work you have done.  Feel grateful for every bit.

 

 

Sometimes, through our witnessing, we realize that we just need a little more time, or information, or experience with it, or a little more dreaming, creating, or planning, to be ready. Realize these possibilities. Life will repeat the experiences we need, giving us endless opportunities to discover and awaken and change.  We must not worry that we missed our chance or blew an opportunity.  Every day brings fresh chances. 

 

When we change, we can pay more attention, asking what we were ready for or needing to learn from the change.  When we witness ourselves responding to the call to change, we stop the randomness, the tailspins, the sideswipes, and the bitterness from feeling as if life is out to get us.

 

Life is not meant to be a sprint.

 

— Joseph Binning

 

 

In being a witness to your life, you will notice your pace is slower.  Slowing down to observe, notice, and feel allows you time to see things you once ignored, or viewed as less important. Minor miracles, like birds in flight, the blueness of the sky, and the vivid blossoming flowers catch our attention, because we are slowing down.  To be a witness to ourselves, we must observe ourselves.  The universe changes for one who studies and learns from there self.  They notice the minor miracles all around them, the greatest of which is their own awakening to their own greatness.

 

The witness is your centering device, the awareness.  It guides the work you do on yourself.

And you can cultivate that awareness in the garden of your being. 

 

—Ram Daas

 

Successful people spend 10% of their time focused on the problems

and 90% of the time focused on the solutions.

— Tony Robbins

 

I meet people every day who, when posed with a problem, only focus on what will go wrong. They justify that focus by rationalizing that they should explore all the options, or have a Plan B, when, they are operating from a fear-based state of being.  What are they afraid of?  

According to the article, “Top Ten Strong Human Fears” on Listverse.com, “Fear is an emotion that protects us from the threats in our surroundings, but which has grown to be more complex; with our fears extending from the weird to the plain absurd, there are certain fears that the great majority of human beings share.”

In order by the most common, modern humanity’s top ten fears are:

  • Failure

Failure is seen differently by everyone.  My favorite example of this is Walt Disney. They rejected him over 300 times, bankers who thought his idea of an amusement park with a Mickey Mouse theme was absurd. Imagine if he had quit after the 299th rejection.  We would never have experienced Disneyland, the Lion King, Beauty and the Beast, or Disneyworld!

  • Death

Fear of death can be linked to fear of the unknown. No one really knows what lies beyond this physical life until they enter it.  Until then, it is unknown.

  • Rejection

This social fear is one reason people blindly follow the actions of others. Based on a fear of being alone, some make their actions and choices on the validation, acknowledgement, or acceptance of others.

  • Ridicule

How many times have you not done something because you were afraid of being mocked or criticized for the way you thought you would look, sound, or seem to others?

  • Loneliness

Lack of human interaction can cause a multitude of problems, from feeling not seen, not loved, not valued, not desirable, and not worthy.  The fear of loneliness brings with it a fear of disconnection with life, love, unity, meaning, and purpose.

  • Misery

Fear of misery is fear of being in a state of great physical, mental, or emotional distress, discomfort, or hopeless suffering.  Ironically, sometimes the fear of misery brings emotional misery.

  • Disappointment 

Fear of disappointment is a fear of sadness, dissatisfaction, sorrow, or displeasure, from the lack of fulfillment of one’s hopes or expectations, or from displeasing another. This fear is part of the reason we avoid the unknown. 

  • Pain

Pain is physical or emotional suffering, or discomfort caused by illness or injury. We avoid it like the plague.  It also refers to emotional suffering or discomfort from loss, rejection, abandonment, or criticism.

  • The Unknown

We root This fear in fear of not being in control. If we do not know what will happen, or what something will be like, or where we will be, or if we cannot control the outcome.  But we never can anyway.

  • Loss of freedom

Not having a say in how you live, where you live, what you eat, when you sleep, how you spend your time, who you communicate and spend time with, how you take care of your body and possessions, or what and how you choose in any area of life is a lack of freedom, and imprisonment.

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Fear of failure is the most common human fear and one of the most common reasons for a lack of self-discipline.  

 

  • Fear prevents us from expressing our truth. 
  • Fear prevents action.  
  • Fear prevents following our desires and dreams
  • Fear prevents taking initiative.
  • Fear prevents perseverance.
  • Fear results in a weakening of our inner strength, our self-esteem, our full experience of life and all its adventure and opportunities.
  • Fear manifests itself differently in each person. 

 

If we have perfectionist tendencies, we might have unrealistically lofty standards, unrealistic expectations, or harsh criticism from ourselves and others.  We may think moving forward into the fear will be bad and painful.  We may think in black and white with no concept of the larger middle grey areas.  

 

We are usually holding beliefs that are not true.  We do not understand that turning the light on our fears creates life-changing growth, learning, higher self-value, new opportunities, and other benefits.

 

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What do fears have to do with discipline?  

 

Self-discipline is one of the most valuable and effective resources we have for looking past our beliefs and their associated fears.  Self-discipline is that fool-proof tool that shifts our thoughts and energy by refocusing us on our vision and the plan to get there.  Self-discipline takes us through the fear, without our even realizing it, and lands us at the end goals of our vision.  Self-discipline is our doorway to success.

 

While there are many factors that can contribute to a person’s level of success, self-discipline is the only measurable guarantee to sustainable, long-term success in life. This applies to our work, all our relationships, our bodies, our finances, our goal accomplishment, and our happiness.  We must integrate self-discipline into our daily routine.

 

According to a 2013 study by Wilhelm Hoffmann, people who achieve and maintain top levels of self-discipline are happier than those who do not.  The study found that self-disciplined people are more capable of dealing with goal orientated setbacks. They are less likely to allow setbacks and feelings to dictate the end results, and they pushed through the valleys of each setback. They seemed to focus more on the end goal than the present moment circumstances, which made it easier to remain focused.  Even when their present moment continually had changes and surprises, their end vision stayed intact.

 

Why is self-discipline such a struggle?  

 

The number one reason people struggle with self-discipline is that humans always seek the path of least resistance. It is human nature for everyone to be lazy sometimes, in some areas. Some have learned how to overcome this tendency.  Others have not.

 

The second reason is that we lack understanding of what self-discipline is and what it is not. 

 

Despite what many believe it to be, self-discipline is a learned behavior, requiring practice and consistent repetition. Self-discipline is the consistent practice of consciously choosing our thoughts and actions and redirecting ourselves when we observe ourselves not consciously choosing.

 

The pathway to reaching our goals is the same pathway to walking past our fears.  

 

It is developing a habit of intentionally chosen actions and thoughts that will produce the results we are looking for.  Keep in mind that lack of self-discipline, or lack of consciously choosing our actions and thoughts, can produce habits we do not want.  Remember, three weeks of consistently doing anything, whether intentional or random, positive, or negative, will create a habit of it.  Having a plan only completes half the job. We must do the steps in our plan, for the plan to work.

 

So, how do we learn self-discipline?  

 

We learn by noticing where our deficiencies might be and by knowing the symptoms of low self-discipline. 

 

Grab a pen and paper and notice which of these questions apply to you and write any thoughts you have about them.    

Ask yourself:

  1. Are you, or are you not satisfied with what you are getting out of life?
  2. Do you, or do you not feel as if you are winning at life?
  3. Do you feel as if you give in too easily to temptation?
  4. Do you feel as if you are a prisoner to negative emotions, such as frustration, resentment, criticality (self or others), anger, or depression?
  5. Do you, or do you not feel as if you can achieve or maintain balance in all areas of life?
  6. Do you feel you are unsuccessful in the way you want to be?
  7. Do you feel as if you have got too much on your plate?
  8. Do you feel as if you are or are not having as much fun or laughter in your days as you deserve?
  9. Do you feel bored, frustrated, or tired often?
  10. Do you feel you are behind in over one area of your personal or professional objectives?
  11. Do you procrastinate a lot?
  12. Do you feel you have gained weight or lost muscle tone?

Asking the tough questions, and answering honestly, is the first step in correcting any problem.

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Suggestions

How to Start Applying Self Discipline

  • Create a vision of what you want in your mind.  

When I quit smoking, I first quit in my head. See in your mind what you want. 

 

  • Commit to your “self.”  

Find what motivates you—your why; write a list.  Keep it with you always and look at it when you feel weak. When I quit smoking after fifteen years my inspiration came by noticing my son wheezing from breathing in my second-hand smoke I exhaled, but I quit for my health first.  I wanted to be around longer.  I wanted to do more, see more, know more, be more—for my son and for me. That was my motivation.

 

  • Do it.  

Do not wait for it to “feel” right before you start, because it never will, or it will fluctuate like the wind. Like Nike says, “Just Do It!”  Lao TZU, of the Tao Te Ching wrote, “The journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step.”  Take the first step!

 

  • Set realistic goals. 

Do not bite off more than you can chew. Frustrated with quitting every year on New Year’s Day and starting up again two or three days later, I knew I needed a plan.  When I successfully quit smoking for good, I quit gradually, steadily reducing my intake over a two-month period. My plan kept me on track. I have not smoked since. Take slight steps. Do not decide you will start running and commit to a marathon next month if you have never run before. Do the research; read up on technique, nutrition, and stretching; find a coach or training program. 

 

  • Write the plan. 

Do not assume you will just automatically allow your vision and desire to take you to the end goal.  Make the plan, write it down, and post it up at eye level in a place you will see every day.  A plan is a set of mini steps toward your goals that take you to the finish line. You need to get it on paper and look at it frequently. Those who fail to plan, plan to fail.

 

  • Remove all temptations that stand in the way of your success. 

If one of your goals is to read more, unplug both your TV and the cable box.  Do not just turn it off; unplug it from the outlet. Waiting for the cable box to reset will make it less convenient to turn it on.  If you want to lose weight, throw away everything you have is not on your approved shopping list. Do not have it anywhere you can easily access it. Remove all temptations. 

 

  • Prearrange your schedule, to accommodate your desired habit.  

If you want to work out, go to sleep one hour earlier, and wake up one hour earlier.  Arrange your schedule with the steps, routines, and resources to support your goal, with no space for slip-sliding. Do not keep committing yourself to things, people, events, and activities that take your time and energy away from where you need it.  It will amaze you at how much energy you will have as you progress. 

 

  • Rearrange your environment.  

Arrange your space and routines to support your goal.  Plan not to be near, or in conversation with that person who always puts self-discipline on the shelf, or anyone who mocks you, steals your time, or has an unhelpful influence on you.  Arrange your work, home, car, and social environments with the focus of staying on track with your goal.

 

  • Identify your whiny voice 

The one you listen to in your head and from your mouth, that sabotages your wish every time.  You know the voice.  It says: “I don’t want to get up; it’s so early.  But I deserve the ice cream; I have been doing so well!  Just one cigarette will be okay.  It was a hard day; I am too tired to exercise.  I cannot do it; it is too hard.  All my friends are going; I will finish that project tomorrow.  I’ll just buy one thing and save my next paycheck.”  Quiet that voice. Have an intentional, focused conversation with that voice to thank it and let it know that you don’t want to hear it anymore and that you are focusing on what you want; then dismiss it.  

 

  • Divert your attention from the temptation or self-sabotaging thoughts by doing something else immediately.  

Meditate, turn on music, do ten or twenty jumping jacks, go for a run, take a shower, take a catnap, have a cup of tea, pet the cat, or take the dog for a walk.  

 

  • Get out your Why card and read it out loud.

Hearing your reasons why, out loud, in your own voice is one of the most powerful tools you have. Use it, often.

 

  • Keep a Victory Journal and fill it up.  

Get a hardcover journal, with pages you cannot tear out easily, and write every victory, no matter how small, every day.  Walk down a different street, so you do not pass the smoke shop, then write it down.  If you worked out that day, whether you walked, lifted weights, danced, played ball, did yoga, rode your bike, did martial arts or hula hoop, write it down.  If you ate within your healthy eating plan for breakfast, lunch, or dinner, write it down.  If you did all three, write it three times.  If you contacted that company to set up the meeting, write it down.  When you are in a valley, and that whiny voice talks to you, pick up the journal and read your victories out loud. It is easier to resist temptation when you hear a reminder of what you have done.

 

  • Reward yourself for achieving your goals.  

By giving yourself positive rewards for achieving your goals you are acknowledging your efforts, both minor and major. Buy an extra item of clothing, get a massage, or take a day trip. Pay cash for that purchase, rather than using credit. Small positive rewards are the key.

 

  • Commit to finish.  

Do not quit. If you quit, you only quit on yourself, and it is hard to live with yourself as a quitter. Do not hit the snooze button in life. Hitting the snooze button has you doing it over and over and over. 

 

What is the definition of insanity? Doing the same thing, day after day, and expecting different results.

 

When you quit, you do not show up for yourself.  If you do not show up for yourself, you tell the world that you do not know your value and abilities.  If you do not know your value and abilities, no one else will either.

 

For each new goal, wash, rinse, repeat.  

It takes only three weeks to create a solid, dependable habit.  Self-discipline is a habit, and it is a habit that you can become addicted to.  

 

What are you waiting for?  Never settle for the second-best version of YOU.

 

Never think you have arrived.  

Your journey is never over.

You will ALWAYS have to work at maintaining and nurturing the things that make you GREAT if you do not want to lose sight of them.


— Joseph Binning

 

If you’re like many of the billions of people alive right now, the current state of the world is causing you to wonder, to look up close at areas of our lives we had set aside, or get to know ourselves on a deeper level. Some are asking for the first time, or in a new way, Why am I here?  Or, What is my purpose in life? I asked myself the same questions, and the answers I found changed my entire life.  There is no better time than now to look at those areas, to know yourself in a way you have never known, know the part you play, and understand your purpose in this world.  I’d like to share with you some of the answers to your deepest questions and help you understand why knowing your deepest purpose matters more today than ever before.

follow this link to 7 Days To Discover Your Purpose

https://www.josephbinning.com/product/the-awakening-seven-days-to-discover-your-purpose/

“The beautiful thing about learning is nobody can take it away from you”

 

— BB King

 

 

Personal growth is one of my favorite subjects, because without it, we cease to exist.

Imagine being a child and never growing through each developmental phase, or into adulthood or maturity.  Skipping a phase or two may be a fantasy for some; however, it is not the reality we came here to experience. Just as a child needs to grow and evolve, to become the person he or she can be, so does the adult.

Personal growth does not limit itself to physical growth.  Personal growth also includes emotional growth, intellectual growth, and spiritual growth.  Personal growth does not limit itself to age.  It is continuing in us from birth to death. 

 

“Personal growth refers to self-development of an individual toward the actualization of his or her potentialities.

Personal growth transforms an individual from dependence to self-direction.”

 

— Answers.com

 

 

“Self-development” is the key phrase in the reference above. Perhaps the most important realization an individual can make in his or her quest for personal growth is that there is no single formula that defines what path will work for any individual. What is good for one person may not be what works for another.

 

We must adapt the seeker philosophy on our paths of personal growth.  We must do the research and put in the miles. It is not the destination that defines us.  It is the journey. It is what you find out about life and about yourself along the way, whatever that is, that creates the “YOU” you can become.  

 

“Your level of success will rarely exceed your level of personal development,

because success is something you “attract” by the person you “become.”

 

Jim Rohn

 

Many of us have natural talents and abilities, but do not strive to improve them.  Like muscles in the body, if we do not use our talents and abilities, we will soon lose them.  If we are not growing, we are dying. Sounds absurd, but it’s true. Every famous successful person whose name we immediately and easily recognize had to master that which he or she became known for.

 
We can have talent but be afraid to use it and never reach our potential.  Or, we can continually strive to become our potential.  It is a choice we either make, or do not make.

 

Why invest in personal growth?

 

To expand your abilities and skills.  To develop new aptitudes and strengthen existing ones.  To increase your understanding and knowledge. Knowledge is potential.  Applied knowledge is action, and it is in the action that our power lies. Having the knowledge about how to open a can of soup is only half as valuable as opening the can.

 

When you do not have the answers that understanding and knowledge provide, walking life’s path can be harrowing.  By investing in personal growth, we gain life experience, which—like a map—can guide us to where we want to go.  And, we gain wisdom.   

 

Walking through life with knowledge, experience, and wisdom gives us confidence and self-worth. Self-worth gives us the faith and inspiration to create the life we want.  In creating the life, we want, rather than reacting to life, we gain mastery of the items we value and the way we value them.

 

Spiritual Growth

 

Spiritual growth has many definitions, depending on the source and belief system of the person.  

As I have stated before, all religions of the world agree that humans begin in the Spirit form and temporarily transform into physical form for this human existence only to return to Spirit form.  We are spirits having a human experience. Not humans having a Spiritual experience.

 

Think about that for a minute, or an hour.  We all start at the same place. We all have a spiritual source. We are all part of something much greater than we could ever be alone.  We are all connected. We are all spirit connected to the vastness of the Universe, the source of all beginnings and endings.

 
All the knowledge of what will be, and has ever been, is within us and our connection to it, just waiting to guide us.   But it is up to us to discover it.  It is up to us to get in touch with it.  We need to grow, to understand who and what we really are.  How our spirituality grows and develops—or does not—depends on us. That is where the human experience comes into play. 

 

I use meditation for the guidance I seek. Meditation can be difficult or tricky in the initial stage of our practice. One must be still and focus. I focus on my breath. As I breathe in, I am thinking in with the good.  As I breathe out, I am thinking out with the bad.  We all meditate in different ways, whether we know it or not. Your meditation might be in the form of silent, relaxed contemplation, to increase your awareness and come to decisions.

You might walk, to clear your mind and know what you want or how you want to do it. You might be still, to receive guidance or answers. You might do guided breath work, or visualization, or yoga.  You might take a nap or connect in your sleep.  You might stare out into nature and let go.  You might connect in a long shower or bath, or in some form of water.  Regardless of the method, you are tapping into that vast resource of knowledge within you for an answer that already exists.

 

Your life is not random or a mistake. You are here for your Spirit-intended purpose. Your job is to discover what that is. It is your job to turn over the rocks to find it, not wait for it to appear. Columbus was a seeker.  The Americas did not find Columbus.  Columbus discovered the Americas. Stop waiting. You already have the answer. You are just not looking in the right place, or in the right way.  The answer will only come from inside you.  Just listen and trust what comes to you. 

 

Download my course SEVEN DAYS TO DISCOVER YOU PASSION if you need help identifying what your Passion is and how to develop it.

 

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Physical Growth

 

In multiple religions, belief systems, and historical teachings, scholars believe that the body is our temple.  If we look at ourselves and dislike what we see, why do we resist changing ourselves, bettering ourselves, enlivening ourselves?   When we deface, dishonor, or ignore our body temples, we do not realize that we are dishonoring ourselves, and stunting our physical growth and our self-worth.

The mind and body work as one.  If someone throws a valuable piece of art in the trash, it does not make it any less valuable.  However, it treats the art in an undeserved and dishonorable way and wastes its potential.

 

I smoked for fifteen years.  It disgusted me with the thought of falling into such an expensive and nasty habit. It made me, my clothing, my car, and my environment stink, and it made my lungs feel awful.  On the first of January, every year, I quit, but then I would start back up two days later, if that long.  It was not until the day I realized what it was doing to my son when I saw him wheezing because of secondhand smoke he was inhaling, that it awakened me out of my unconsciousness and inspired me into growing stronger.

 

In that awareness, I became a seeker, searching for a way that I could quit for good. It was hard—so hard. The voices in my head kept repeating You can’t do this; just start back up, and your suffering will all stop.” To this day, quitting the habit has been the hardest thing I have ever done.  But I have not smoked since. 

 

How did I do it?  In the same way I have asked you in previous posts, to get a pen and write your responses and thoughts.  I put in writing my reason to change.  Every time I wanted to start back up again, I thought of that reason.  I remembered the actual action of putting my pen to paper and writing my reason, and all the emotion and conviction I felt while I wrote it. 

 

The process of my writing my reason to change, and reading my reason out loud every day, carved a new neuro pathway in my mind, that helped me to remember that my reason to change was so much bigger and more valuable to me than my reason to cave and keep the nasty addiction, which was just a habit.  

 

Habits are easy to start and difficult to change. It takes three weeks of consistently to create a habit, good or bad. Sometimes we just need the right reason to propel us toward physical improvement, or any kind of growth.

 

Without a strong enough reason to change, you will always leave a way out. A way to quit. There is an old saying about success by Plato: “If you want to take the island, then burn the boats.” Only you can find the right reason for you. What is your reason? Every person reading this has one. Find it. And write it. Then burn the boats. Leave no way to go back, only forward.

 

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Emotional Growth

 

Emotional development is defined as a child’s growing ability to develop and regulate a full range of emotions, from sadness or anger to happiness and compassion, and shift from one to another in an easy, conscious, and free manner, preparing the child to take on more responsibility for his or her internal state.

 

Emotional development also refers to the child’s ability to develop secure relationships, social interaction, empathy toward others, and resolution of conflicts, without feeling the need or desire for physical aggression. The continual development and strengthening of all these abilities are emotional growth.

 

Growing scientific evidence shows that a child’s experiences during the early years play a significant role in emotional development.  Studies have shown that the emotional climate at home and the emotional regulations displayed by parents and caretakers affect a child’s emotional development.  

 

Children who do not develop emotional health, freedom, and maturity are at risk of forming unhealthy attachments, experiencing peer group challenges, and suffering from mental illness. 

 

Unfortunately, many of us did not develop the proper tools we needed to develop healthy emotionally.  We formed our Habits and beliefs throughout childhood; we created the patterns of our lives, and we carried these patterns into adulthood without realizing it.  It is not until we experience setbacks and adversity and finally take a serious look at the person we see in the mirror each day

 

Part of our dysfunction in developing emotionally lies in the very widespread belief that a specified set of behaviors, circumstances, and realities are normal and healthy.  But there is a vast difference between normal and common.

 

Are these things we consider “normal,” normal because we have the personal experience of understanding that they are normal, did someone teach or tell you they are normal, or because they are so commonly seen around us we believe they are normal?  Are they common in another state?  Another part of the world?  Another race?  Another culture?  Another time periods.  Why, or why not?  Never stop asking why.

 

Never stop being curious.  Never stop paying attention to the emotional and sensory signals within you.  Imagine you are walking on a trail in the middle of nowhere with no one around, and the trail you are on leads to a dangerous cliff that would kill you if you walked off it. Would you continue in the same direction on that trail because someone told you to, or would you listen to your inner guidance and change directions?

 

Are you choosing where you are going and why you are going there?  Or, are you following?  Are you listening to your inner knowing, guidance, emotional cues, and senses?  This is the strengthening of your emotional muscles.   If you ignore these innate abilities, you suppress your emotional growth, weaken your abilities to experience compassion, joy, and peace, and become disillusioned and hurt, or hurt others.  Never stop following your highest emotion. 

 

Intellectual Growth

 

Intellectual growth refers to: “personal or communal intellectual development.
We can derive this from the spreading of new ideas, such as during the Enlightenment, or through personal educational pursuits, like higher education”
(Answers.com).  

 

Intellectual development is the development of independent thought and reason, in relation to the world around you. 

 

To attain Intellectual health, growth, and well being, you must first start by expanding your knowledge.  When we learn or practice a new skill, read a thought-provoking book, get involved in the community, attend lectures, art exhibits, or musical or theater performances, or learn a new language, we are growing our intellectual health. 

 

In addition, we are strengthening our critical thinking and analysis abilities. Think of a child who wants to understand everything because it does not know the why or how. It is when the child asks us “Why?” that we need to understand the full answer we are about to give. If we honestly want to give the child the best, most truthful answer, so he or she can use that information to make good decisions, we must give the very highest information we can get. And to do that, we must research, including searching within ourselves.

 

We should look at Intellectual growth in the same way.  Are the decisions we make based on the absolute best information that we can find and that is available? Or are we using outdated or incorrect data that we provided ourselves with, or others told us?

 

Is the information we used based on our own knowledge, or based on that of people who teach us to follow, believe, and respect? And does the information align with whom we are as individuals, or are we just following an outdated and incorrect pattern taught to us somewhere, sometime and never checked to see if it is valid? 

 

The intellect is a powerful muscle that can atrophy if not stimulated and strengthened continually throughout our lives.

 

 

 

Write your responses to the following questions: 

 

Do you strive to improve yourself physically?  

 

Do you strive to improve yourself emotionally?

 

Do you strive to improve yourself spiritually?

 

Do you strive to improve yourself intellectually?

 

Are you open to new ideas? 

 

Do you try to learn new skills?

 

Do you appreciate stimulating mental activities?

 

Do you use creativity to solve problems?

 

Do you consider opposing ideas and opinions?

 

Do you strive to understand yourself and your emotions?

 

If you answered no to any of the questions above, it is time to open yourself to your higher potential.

 

What areas of yourself and your life would you like to see growth in most?  

 

What or who, is holding you back from growing?

 

Life can be scary sometimes, but the more you grow, the more you will know. The more you know, the more change you can help to create, for yourself, and for those around you. 

 

 

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Growth cancels out fear. 

Joseph Binning

 

Think of growth as an investment in YOU, your future, what you will give to the world, and everything and everyone that has anything to do with you. To have more than you have got, you must become more than you are now.  You must grow into the new skin of your potential.

 

By investing the time and energy in yourself, your reward will be exponentially greater than your initial investment.  And then, one day, you will discover that the student has become the teacher. 

 

It is in the struggle and the battle that heroes are born.

Joseph Binning

 

Only through lifelong growth and the desire to expand can change happen. Get your boots on and get in the trenches.  Then watch yourself rise.

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